Xiomáro Photography | New York
 

Home      Buy Prints      Buy Books      Galleries      Commissions      Exhibits      Media      Bio      Video/Music      Contact

   
William Floyd's House of Revolution
   

     William Floyd was an American Revolutionary and signer of the Declaration of Independence.  Together with fellow rebels like George Washington, Floyd served in the first Continental Congress in 1774.  By the late 1770s, the British occupied Long Island and Floyd escaped to Connecticut.  Floyd returned to a ransacked house, which he restored to receive visitors such as Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and other notable guests.  

     Floyd's home, known as The Old Mastic House, is located in Mastic, Long Island, and is part of Fire Island National Seashore
.  In addition to offering free house tours, visitors can avail themselves of Fire Island’s dynamic barrier island beaches, which offer solitude, camaraderie and spiritual renewal. 

     Remarkably, Old Mastic House was continuously occupied by Floyd’s descendants up until 1976 when it was donated to the National Park Service.  So the photographs also show how both the house and the new nation grew, expanded and evolved together through history.  Like America’s motto – e pluribus unum – the house stands as one unified historical structure comprised of many evolving styles in architecture, furnishings, design and technology.

     Because the British ransacked Old Mastic House, not many items belonging to William Floyd have survived.  But the photographs below feature a number of personal possessions, many of which were released from a storage facility that is no longer accessible by the public.  Apart from the Declaration of Independence, several versions of Floyd's signature can be seen along with his sword and hunting musket.  I was amused to learn that the bottles in his traveling "medicine" chest actually held liqour, which is a fine companion to his red metal snuff box.  His furnishings include a Chippendale secretary (or desk) and several Windsor chairs.  The canes by the door are believed to be Floyd's as they are very similar to the ones depicted in a portrait hanging in the Main Hall.  

     The photographs were commissioned by the National Park Service and, in subsequent pages, present interior views and perspectives that visitors to the sprawling 25 room house are not likely to see as well as spaces that are closed to the public, views of the grounds, outbuildings and the Floyd family cemetery (including an area with markers believed to be associated with slaves).

   

Click Any Image To Start Slideshow
Page 1
< Page 8 of 8                    
                 Page 2 of 8 > 
   
< Page 8 of 8                    
                   Page 2 of 8 > 
Page 1
   
© 2017 Xiomáro